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More Driftless for less dollars

June 2, 2016 by Eric Frydenlund

More Driftless for less dollars.  So says our promotion, which offers visitors many of our most popular activities and attractions at discounted prices through June 15. 

An observant reader pointed out that it should read “fewer dollars” or “less money.” As an English major, I felt the grammar lesson hit home; as when our history teacher in seventh grade threw a chalkboard eraser at those of us who were not paying attention.  Suddenly, history made an “impression” on us.

And so – grammatically correct – “with fewer dollars, you can experience more Driftless.”  The important word here is “more.” 

Fishing 144x144As in more of the incomparable scenery of a region shaped by rivers and left untouched by glaciers.  More fishing on world-class rivers and trout streams.  More history of early exploration and settlement.  More canoeing and kayaking on the Kickapoo River.  More shopping in our small-town, big-hospitality stores.  And more family fun for the kids and the child in all of us.

As someone who has lived in Driftless Wisconsin most of my life, I find the prospect of more Driftless appealing.  I can’t get enough. I have fished the Mississippi, cast a fly on a trout stream, canoed the Kickapoo, woken up in a cabin overlooking the river, shopped in a Scandinavian store, and discovered my Norwegian heritage at Norskedalen Nature and Heritage Center.  Yet there are always new discoveries awaiting. 

I spent all yesterday fishing and boating on the Mississippi River, enjoying every last minute of daylight squeezed between the Wisconsin and Iowa bluffs. Every passing boater offered a wave of the hand, a sort of secret-handshake sharing of our good fortune of a day on the river.

Indeed, if you search our discounted itineraries, you’ll find as many ways to spend a day as there are days in the week. Seven itineraries, each with a different focus, each in a different region of Driftless Wisconsin. 

Whether it’s with less money or fewer dollars, you’ll get more of what makes Driftless Wisconsin such a special place.

Photographing Scenery in Driftless Wisconsin

April 6, 2015 by Eric Frydenlund

We had arrived home after our vacation when we first saw it standing on the western horizon; a shaft of light rising skyward from where the sun had just set. The Driftless area, with a topography sculpted from earth by water over time, generally needs no further visual enhancement. Yet there it stood, an arrow of fire stuck in the Iowa bluffs as if slung from Greek mythology.

Many would be satisfied with the show without further explanation, but curiosity got the best of me. Spoiler alert: looking up the phenomena on Google, I discovered this was a solar pillar, caused by the reflection of light from ice crystals suspended in the atmosphere. Sun Pilar

“Was it meant just for us?” I wondered, given most of the town was hiding inside from single digit temperatures on that cold winter day. Then we saw a neighbor rush outside and frantically snap photos, while we sat in our car.

I recovered my senses and got out of the car to take the accompanying photo.  I took the photo with my smart phone, since I did not have my camera with me.  That was a mistake; I’m learning to have my camera in the car while traveling Driftless Wisconsin.  With its high bluffs and deep valleys, the topography lends a three-dimensional backdrop to any setting.

Favorite subjects while photographing scenery in Driftless Wisconsin

When it comes to photographing scenery in Driftless Wisconsin, sunsets are my favorite subject; as well as for many others. Traveling the Great River Road along the Mississippi River on Highway 35, it’s not unusual to see a photographer set up along the road at sunset.  You just can’t resist a photo of the sun setting over the Iowa bluffs across the wide expanse of the Mississippi. There’s several overlooks and waysides where you can pull over out of traffic and set up your tripod.

If you’re lucky, you might catch an eagle hovering over the river looking for his next meal. And of course during spring and fall migration, hundreds of thousands of migrating birds use the river corridor as a flyway.  According to the Upper Mississippi River National Fish and Wildlife Refuge website, April and May is prime time for photographing song bird migration.

The backroads of Driftless Wisconsin offer a chance to get away from traffic and immerse yourself in nature and rural settings. Rustic barns, rolling farmland, foggy mornings, and secluded valleys offer the photographer unforgettable subjects; and a quiet getaway to boot. Highway 131 along the Kickapoo River presents many such opportunities, with the winding river appearing and disappearing amid the valley flora. Take any side road and you’re immediately lost in a forgotten land, ripe for capturing through a camera lens.

The most tempting subjects are the Driftless landscape taken from one of the many overlooks.  Something about the undulating land that begs to be remembered in your photo album of places you’ve been.  The parks offer the most accessible overlooks; the best at Wildcat Mountain State Park near Ontario and Wyalusing State Park near Prairie du Chien.

Solar pillars are pretty rare; it’s the first one I’ve seen in my long life.  Yet the Driftless landscape always offer the photographer something rare; a place where the land rises and falls as surely as the sun.

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